Our tongue and Groove Kitchen Ceiling

I live on a little farm in a farm house.

So why not have a tongue and groove ceiling in my kitchen to go with it?

This was definitely a labor of love.  Would I do it again?  It’s kind of like giving birth with no drugs.  Ask me again in a couple of years and I might say yes.

It was hard because I wanted a clean crisp look.  If you want it rustic, GO FOR IT!  It would be so much easier!

  If you are ready for the birth with no drugs, GREAT!

I am so happy with the results though and I will never get tired of looking at my ceiling.

This is where I got my inspiration

Jenna Sue Design

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I really feel in love with her kitchen!

So I convinced my husband to do this ceiling in ours 🙂

This was definitely a labor of love.  Would I do it again?  It’s kind of like giving birth with no drugs.  Ask me again in a couple of years and I might say yes.

It was hard because I wanted a clean crisp look.  If you want it rustic, GO FOR IT!  It would be so much easier!

  If you are ready for the birth with no drugs, GREAT!

I am so happy with the results though and I will never get tired of looking at my ceiling.

This is how our kitchen looked before.

(We are building the cabinets up to the ceiling and that piece on top is a little mock of what I want.)

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Here’s what we started with…

Blue Pine tongue and groove from Home Depot

I think each board was like $2.

The whole ceiling ended up being about $500

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Then we found the floor beams in the ceiling with a stud finder.

We marked them and put a chalk line on them.

We felt it best that all the wood be nailed into something solid.

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Then we started nailing them up.

  We chose a random pattern because I was not planning on putting up wood beams to cover the seams and I did not want them all in one place.

(Although that would have been waaaaay easier!  The seams were a major pain in my rear to fill and sand!)

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This cute boy did not like the sound of the nail gun!

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We didn’t  worry too much about the edges because we were going over it with crown molding.

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It was easiest for us to both have a ladder.  This is definitely a 2 person job.

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We have quite a few can lights.

Neil came up with his own little way of cutting them out.

Hopefully you will understand 🙂

He measured the circumference of the can light and made a pattern to trace onto the wood.

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We held the piece up to where it would needed to be.  Marked where the can would go.  Found center and the edge and marked it.

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Then traced on the circle and cut it.

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Then we would nail that piece up and when we came to the other half of the circle we would put it up and mark the edges.

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And measure how far out we needed it to come.  Then we would do follow the same process as the first piece.  Mark, trace and cut.

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We went through and filled and sanded once everything was up.

This is what we used I was told by my cabinet guy this would be best for the expansion and contraction of the wood.

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All up, patched and sanded.  I’m not going to lie.  This. was. PAINFUL.

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I primed it with Kilz primer and then painted it in a semi-gloss finish with Benjamin Moore Simply White.

I didn’t worry about the edges painting either, again because we were putting up crown.

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Crown going up.

  I did pre-paint the crown before we put it up so I didn’t have to cut in the edges on the groove where the wood meets together.

That would have been a headache!

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We followed this pattern from Sawdust girl.  I really love her.  I’ve been following her for years.

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Tomorrow the finished product 🙂


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